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Author Topic: PPP house lots .... anyone?  (Read 23479 times)
BK
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« Reply #100 on: December 01, 2010, 09:55:56 AM »

i hope you will shut your pie hole next year after the election and the ppp/c is still in power.this is the same way that people like you have been criticizing the ppp/c before the last general election and at the end of all the crap talking the ppp/c still regain power of this country.

you can take your effing crap and stuff it up your arse as well as Fagdeo. all alyuh need to have both of your hands chopped off with the wholescale thiefing that alyuh going on with
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« Reply #101 on: December 01, 2010, 10:00:57 AM »

The stupid ass COOLIE AND BLACK canecuttahs have allowed Fagdeo and his forty thieves to plunder and rob at will. All dem hands should be chopped off. How much did Fagdeo paid off the milkdrinker Corbin for keeping his trap shut on this wanton pillage by Fagdeo and his thieves?

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There are over 300 hundred “Wikileaks” documents on Guyana
December 1, 2010 | By KNews | Filed Under Features / Columnists, Freddie Kissoon 


I attended the ACDA wake for the late Winston Murray on Sunday evening. When there was a snacks break, people gathered into little corners of the ACDA pavilion and chatted on their own, personal topics. One of the encounters I had was about the sale of public property behind the Sparendaam Police Station which has gone for $5 million per acre. The President is putting up a mansion there (if Khurshid Sattaur could call my upper working class home a mansion, there won’t be words for him to describe what Mr. Jagdeo is building there) and so are many other PPP kings.

Strangely, Dr. Compton Bourne of the Caribbean Development Bank has a plot there as was reported in this newspaper two Sundays ago Nicknamed Pradoville 2, what is going on there is an act that is utterly shameless. One Minister has bought huge plots of land from the sale of Leonora estate from Guysuco. This man has a large home he built behind Leonora Police Station. How come he got an acre of public land in Sparendaam for $5 million?

My point to the PNC person who was talking to me at the wake was that the PNC, AFC and other stakeholders allowed the PPP Government and the Jagdeo presidency to do whatever it chose to with the resources of the country because there is no opposition. Now the degeneracy is beyond imagination. This is the way a dictatorship behaves. Add to the nature of dictatorship, the PPP’s own peculiar brand of oligarchy and you have a phantasmagoria of authoritarian nightmares. The Pradoville 2 scandal is just the latest episode of this nightmarish terror.

There are two features to note about elite rule in Guyana. One is that it is a dictatorship and therefore it embodies the main features of autocracy – irrationality, insensitivity, immorality but most of all, invincibility. The latter characteristic of invincibility comes about through society’s fear and apathy.
Totalitarian regimes never emerge from the wilderness with their invincibility intact. Their omnipotence is derived from the latitude given to them by a jaded, tired, frightened population and an inept, foolish opposition.

In Guyana, the Jagdeo administration has tested the waters more times than we can count and has succeeded. This is how invincibility comes into play. A dictatorship embarks on an egregiously immoral and blatantly illegal path. The opposition allows it to proceed. It will do similar acts a million times over. In Guyana, some of these pathways are so morally and legally nasty that confrontation from the opposition had to be the only option available. I honestly don’t know where to start.

No one in this country except Mr. Jagdeo and a few of his elites know about the lie detector tests given to CANU officers and what are the results. We are told Mr. This and Mr. That failed the test. How do we know that? I have been told that there are over 300 US Embassy cables on Guyana in the Wikileaks cache and it would be interesting to read what the Kingston building had to say about drug trafficking in Guyana.

I have been told, also, that the server is congested so the Guyana cables are not released as yet. I hope what is said about the Jagdeo regime in those cables will finally galvanize Guyanese to act against totalitarianism in Guyana. Add to the general features of dictatorship, the peculiar instincts of the PPP and you have a recipe for disaster in Guyana. The Jagans have nurtured in all their underlings a sense of manifest destiny. Coupled with this was the insistence that Georgetown is a hostile place to the PPP and will not permit that manifest destiny to appear.

So two morbid instincts are embedded in PPP leaders – they are destined to rule Guyana and envious forces in the population will never allow that. These two traits are at the heart of the PPP’s exercise of power. When the PPP won the 1992 elections, Cheddi and Janet came face to face with their dream of manifest destiny – like Lenin, Cheddi Jagan was born to lead Guyana and the historic vanguard PPP into a future of greatness. How does this tie in with the concept and behaviour of dictatorship? If you are fated to be messianic then no one should question your motive. You feel that you can do what you want because the lesser mortals are too inferior to be questioning your action.

The die is cast – from Pradoville 2 it is anyone’s guess where the next stop is.
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« Reply #102 on: December 01, 2010, 10:02:33 AM »

They (PPP) can lead Guyana as long as I am not living there.
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« Reply #103 on: December 01, 2010, 10:05:00 AM »

When will all those behind the fraud committed at Pradoville 2 be charged for the same crime as this woman?  This lady real stupid she should have tell the people that she can get them prime land at Pradoville 2 for the same price.

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Woman fleeced man of $430,000 by promising plot of land -court told
By Stabroek staff  |  View Comments  Local News | Wednesday, December 1, 2010

A woman who is accused of soliciting a sum of money after falsely promising a man that she could obtain a plot of land for him was on Monday admitted to bail in the sum of $250,000 after appearing before acting Chief Magistrate Priya Sewnarine-Beharry.

The allegation against Oma Chaitram is that between November 4, 2009 and March 4, 2010 she obtained from Clarence De Brayer $430,000 by falsely pretending that she was in a position to purchase a plot of land located at La Bonne Intention.

The woman was not required to plead to the indictable charge of obtaining money by false pretence when it was read to her by the acting chief magistrate. In giving the facts of the case, prosecutor Stephen Telford told the court that the virtual complainant who is a businessman had been told by the accused who was a former legal secretary that she would have the transport for the land processed after receiving the sum mentioned in the charge.


Oma Chaitram

Failing to honour her end of the arrangement, Telford said that a police report was made which later led to the woman’s arrest. The prosecutor who said that the woman had lodged the money in question at the Criminal Investigation Department had no objection to her being granted bail but requested that it be in a substantial amount.

The prosecutor excused the absence of the complainant from court whom he said is overseas. Chaitram who resides at 37 Leonora, West Coast Demerara was later granted her pretrial liberty in the sum of $250,000. She was ordered to return to court on January 31.
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« Reply #104 on: December 01, 2010, 02:51:27 PM »

At least she still had the money. She isn't as bad as some others. Unless she's running a pyramid scheme and scamming other people and paying him back with other people's money after she spent his.
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« Reply #105 on: December 02, 2010, 08:19:03 AM »

They (PPP) can lead Guyana as long as I am not living there.


Well i guess that you dont want to be part of development that Guyana has gotten so far...........
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« Reply #106 on: December 02, 2010, 09:29:56 AM »

That's right sir. One man's meat is another man's poison.
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« Reply #107 on: December 10, 2010, 12:31:16 PM »

Somerset $55M water facility commissioned
By Stabroek editor  |  0 Comments 
Breaking News | Friday, December 10, 2010

    A $55M well and pumping station was yesterday commissioned at Somerset on the Essequibo Coast and Water Minister Irfaan Ali praised the performance of GWI.

Commissioning the facility, Ali told those gathered that the government has expended more than $765M within the last three years on such facilities.

According to the Government Information Agency, Ali cautioned however that “Sustaining the water sector requires financial input,” and that citizens must take the responsibility of paying for water seriously.
Ali added that “one of the major challenges in the water sector has been non-payment for the commodity”.

He praised the Guyana Water Inc for an “excellent” job done in the last year, noting the project implementation rate of the Ministry has increased to the point where the capital works programme has been completed well before the windup of the year.
Pointing to GWI’s improved capacity,  Ali said that almost all of the wells that were commissioned were designed and supervised by GWI’s engineers.  The result, the Minister said is money saved and opportunities to extend the same services to more communities.
Earlier in the year, GINA said that President Bharrat Jagdeo had committed to measuring the progress in the sector by a colour-coded process, with blue being the standard of excellence. Almost the entire Essequibo coast has achieved the blue standard, the Minister said, noting that the only area that presents a challenge is Charity. The water treatment network for that area should be completed early next year.
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« Reply #108 on: December 10, 2010, 12:52:36 PM »

and still people are  buying water to drink and cook.
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« Reply #109 on: December 17, 2010, 11:12:39 AM »

While the richer getting and the poor is heading towards absolute poverty under the Champion beggar

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THE LAND BELONGS TO THE PEOPLE
December 17, 2010 | By KNews | Filed Under Features / Columnists, Peeping Tom 

This term of the PPP administration has been distinguished by one main feature. The rich are getting richer. From 2006 onwards what we have had in Guyana are policies being implemented that have caused those with wealth to become richer. This term of the PPP administration has been good for the rich. They have reaped great rewards as a result of the policies of the administration. This is shocking when one considers that the ruling party is supposed to be working class in orientation. It is shocking when one considers that there is still absolute poverty in Guyana. It is shocking when one considers that there is a growing gap between rich and poor within the society.

If there is anything that signals the present administration’s support for private businesses over the small man, it is an advertisement which appeared in last Sunday’s newspaper inviting expressions of interest from private developers to be involved in developing a massive stretch along the East Bank of Demerara that will cater for some 38,000 persons. The government had some time ago announced that it was expanding housing along the East Bank of Demerara. The demand for housing remains high and it was expected that when the new housing development kicked in, many of those who did not own homes would have been afforded the opportunity to live in the new schemes to be developed along the East Bank. The East Bank schemes were expected to help ease the shortage of housing among the poor. It would also aid in empowering the poor since owning their own homes would be a base upon which they can build on in the future.

But just how many of the lots that will be available on the East Bank will end up in the hands of the poor? Who will benefit more from the new schemes that will be developed between Agricola and Herstelling? The government has now signaled that unlike the vast majority of housing schemes in Guyana which were developed without private developers, the government wants to involve these developers in the proposed massive developments along the East Bank. What we have is a proposal for public/private partnerships, private developers and the government. Some lots will therefore be developed by the government for the poor, but what is worrying is why it was necessary in the first place, given the still high demand for housing by the poor, for these sorts of partnerships which do nothing more than put wealth into the hands of the rich.

When private developers are involved, they do so for profit.  They are in it to make money. They invest their capital and they expect a return. In a market economy, there should be a place for private housing developers. But this does not mean that state land must be sold to them for development. These developers usually end up building for the rich; creating high-end homes for the wealthy. So why should state land be made available for these purposes when these private capitalists can well afford to go onto the private market and build houses on private land as has been done to such great effect?
Private developers do not usually build houses for poor people. It is the middle class and rich who can afford these homes. Why use the land belonging to the people to further enrich those who are wealthy? Why private developers for this land? Why a public/private partnership, when it is obvious that what will be created in the process are schemes that will benefit primarily those who are already wealthy?


What happens is that the government sells this land for a premium price, say, $2M per lot. The developer then builds a $6M property and sells it to the rich for $10M, making two million on every lot. But it does not end there. What we have developing is now an exclusive scheme and within one year, the prices for those houses will appreciate to around $15M. Thus, it is rich homeowners becoming wealthier. The government each year boasts about the billions that it spends on developing housing schemes. It always omits to mention that it also collects billions from poor families who pay substantial sums for their house lots. While private developers will help absorb some of the expenditure that would otherwise have to be funded by government, these developers also end up making a healthy profit after they would have built their mansions which are then sold to the rich.

So three things happen. The first is that land which belongs to the people of this country ends up in the hands of the wealthy and the rich developers end up making huge profits from the development of the schemes. Then these schemes become exclusive high income schemes and appreciate in value faster than the normal housing schemes, thereby making the owners richer. It is a vicious cycle that increases the gap between rich and poor. This is what is going to happen on the East Bank of Demerara. Private/public partnership in housing is going to enrich those who are already rich. It is going to result, also, in rich persons buying up land which belongs to all the people of Guyana. The poor and those who do not yet own their own homes should have been given all of this land so that they too can share in the national pie.
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« Reply #110 on: December 21, 2010, 10:42:14 AM »

Why is this allowed in the city centre?
By Stabroek staff  |  View Comments  |Letters | Tuesday, December 21, 2010

Dear Editor,

Can the city council say why it is that they are allowing this homeless person to create this unsightly mess between Fogarty’s and Muneshwer’s in the heart of the city?

Yours faithfully,
Bryan Mackintosh


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« Reply #111 on: December 21, 2010, 01:05:05 PM »

The dude has prime real estate with hibiscus flowers on his front lawn. He is going nowhere real fast.
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« Reply #112 on: December 21, 2010, 03:03:17 PM »

many moons ago a woman once lived there along with her son who was not more than 3-4 years old, maybe iits her son who took up residence.  Come in Kawku
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« Reply #113 on: December 21, 2010, 03:49:10 PM »

that shows the growth in the homelessness in Guyana because many can't afford to pay the price that Mr. 20% has been demanding from Guyanese for a houselot.
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« Reply #114 on: February 26, 2011, 07:26:42 AM »

more on last year floods
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« Reply #115 on: February 26, 2011, 09:34:38 AM »

only two months in the new year and the development of house lot around the country has already began.
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« Reply #116 on: February 26, 2011, 04:18:32 PM »

only two months in the new year and the development of house lot around the country has already began.
Yes ... I see things are really picking up at Pradoville II. I hear Pradoville II bypassed other villages and has already gotten water when there aren't even finished houses there yet. It's good to be the king. LOL
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« Reply #117 on: February 26, 2011, 05:23:46 PM »

only two months in the new year and the development of house lot around the country has already began.

since  you are so 'dense' let me clear the air for you -- that is the PPP thieves giving themselves, their family, friends and CONMEN several houselots for free. while the poor people have to fork out hundred of thousands just for a small plot of land. That is sick sick sick. But guess what in the long run they would all have to pay, god and mother nature will have the last word.
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« Reply #118 on: March 15, 2011, 06:55:18 PM »

push- plastic city residents should all take up residency in Pradoville 2.
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« Reply #119 on: June 03, 2011, 10:29:37 AM »

Lethem severely affected by heavy rains
June 3, 2011 | By KNews | Filed Under News 


The Lethem Public Market now seems like an island after several days of heavy rain.

During the past week, incessant rainfall has affected a number of businesses and homes in Lethem, and in many cases, villagers have had to utilise boats to traverse the area. Kaieteur News understands that yesterday morning the water was knee-deep and even higher in some sections.

Many children have not been able to attend school for the past few days, and businesses have shut their doors with the owners expressing hope that the rains will come to an end soon. A quantity of items in stores have been damaged or destroyed due to the fact that they have been under water for quite some time.

This newspaper was told that some of the farmers of St. Ignatius have also suffered tremendously, particularly with their crops and livestock. A number of residents who have personal “kitchen gardens” and depend on their produce for their livelihood are now at a loss as to what their next step will be. Vendors who operate at the Lethem Public Market are also wondering what the outcome of this rainy period will be since they cannot enter the market (which is closed off due to the flood) and will not be able to sell their produce for a lengthy period.
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« Reply #120 on: June 06, 2011, 09:45:49 AM »

Water water everywhere but not a drop to drink. Pradoville 1&2 next!!!!! How much of the LCDS funds will Fagdeo allocate to the 'natives'?

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Lethem flood deepens Essential services hit, some houses have collapsed
By Gaulbert Sutherland  |  7 Comments  |Local News | Monday, June 6, 2011

Flood-hit communities across the Rupununi struggled to cope as rising waters downed essential services in Lethem and government scrambled to bring relief.

Residents are preparing for the “long haul” after electricity and water supplies were cut in the regional administrative centre, Lethem and families fled homes for emergency shelters. Yesterday, roads and bridges remained under water, businesses were shuttered and schools were ordered closed in the community, on the border with Brazil. “There’s no rain but the water keeps coming up,” said Terrence Boston, the Chairman of the Ireng/ Sawariwau Neighbourhood Democratic Council (NDC), under which Lethem falls.  He explained that since Saturday the steady rainfall recorded in the past days had eased but it continued drizzling and yesterday there was some sunshine. “The water keeps coming. It is the first time in the history of the Rupununi, I think, that the water has come to this level,” he said. “Lethem is in for a long haul,” Boston added.


The flooded main road that runs between the Regional Administration offices and the airstrip in Lethem.

In the wake of what residents described as the “worst” flooding they have ever experienced, Prime Minister Samuel Hinds flew into Lethem yesterday and met with the regional administration on measures for emergency relief. Civil Defence Force head, Colonel (rtd) Chabilall Ramsarup also arrived with the team. The Red Cross has been working to provide some relief but residents fear harder times as the water rises. Road links to the remote Amerindian communities in the Deep South Rupununi were cut with bridges and roads swamped by the flood-waters. Even before Lethem was flooded, the South Rupununi experienced similar conditions and it is continuing and farms have been swamped.

Minister of Transport and Hydraulics, Robeson Benn told Stabroek News yesterday that government will monitor how the situation unfolds over the next few days and various types of assistance are being pulled together. Benn has been in the flood-hit town for a few days now and he said that the army plane that brought in the Prime Minister also brought in supplies including cots and water treatment kits for those in shelters. Various other items such as small generators and pumps have been procured in Lethem while the army aircraft will return today bringing more supplies.


A flooded restaurant and bar in Lethem close to the Tabatinga Creek yesterday.

Benn said that about 60 families have had to leave their homes in Lethem with over 213 persons in shelters at the Arapaima Primary School, the Christian Brethren Church, the Culvert City Nursery School, the Lethem Hospital Compound and other buildings. Three houses have collapsed in Lethem while six have collapsed in communities in the North Rupununi, he said.

Waters had risen rapidly over the past days and overnight on Saturday, the water rose 20 inches and up to yesterday afternoon, a further 18 inches were recorded, Benn said. With regards to declaring a state of emergency in the region, the minister said that government will look to see how the situation unfolds over the next few days before making any major decision. “The key thing is whether the water will come down over the next two to three days,” said Benn. The neighbouring State of Roraima in Brazil has also been affected by severe floods and a state of emergency has been declared there. The basins of the Rio Branco and Ireng Rivers have been overflowing from recent rains contributing to flooding here since the basins of those rivers and the Takutu River are interlinked.

Power plant
In Lethem yesterday, residents said that the worst flood they have ever experienced is worsening “There’s no lights in the community, there’s no (drinking) water in the community and soon there will be no food,” one man told Stabroek News
.


The Lethem Power station under water yesterday.

The power plant in Lethem shut-down due to floodwaters in the building and the water utility halted operations since water had entered the pump station. Many residents used personal wells but floodwaters entered many leaving them unusable. Some businesses and homeowners rushed to place sandbags around their buildings as the floodwaters threatened. “They’re fighting a losing battle. The water just keeps rising,” the resident observed.

Benn said that they are working to see if power can be restored as soon as possible, by today or tomorrow. With regards to water, he said that the water utility normally uses three sources and two have been compromised while the third is still safe. Some water is being pumped to a section of the community and water is being delivered to the shelters, he said. Further, a tractor with water tanks will be deployed to take water to areas where there is no supply. The Remote Area Medical (RAM) organization in Lethem has offered the use of their well and this will be taken up, the Minister said. Pumps are expected to be flown in today for this purpose.

The key things are putting in some alternative power and ensuring a safe and healthy water supply, Benn said. Roads across the region have been affected and Benn said two bridges in the vicinity of Kumu were damaged while there is extensive flooding between Aishalton and Para Bara in the Deep South Rupununi. Along the Linden-Lethem trail through which virtually all goods are taken to the vast region, traffic has been halted after damage to several bridges and culverts and water flooded sections of the trail. Benn said that there are problems with four bridges along the trail on the Iwokrama side and two teams are working to have these repaired by Wednesday. On the other side of the Essequibo, teams from Demerara Timbers Limited and Mekdeci are working on the road. “Depending on what the weather does in the next few days…we hope to have the road in better shape,” Benn said. He added that they hope to have the road passable at least for trucks.

Boats belonging to the army and the regional administration have been shifting persons around in Lethem but given the difficulty in moving around in the high waters, regional authorities ordered that schools in the community be closed for the rest of the week.  The Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) examinations currently in progress were shifted from the St. Ignatius Secondary School to the regional education building in Lethem. Benn said that examination papers were also flown to centres in Aishalton and Annai yesterday.

In the Deep South Rupununi, Benn said, there is extensive flooding and between 60 to 70% of farms are under water. “The communities have been advised to reap what they can…” said the minister adding that they are monitoring the situation. Questioned about the outbreak of any diseases, the minister said that there have been no reports. “We anticipate it and we have supplies on hand,” he said adding that replenishments are being made available.

A 24-hour monitoring station has been set up in Lethem and the authorities are in contact with other communities via radio, the minister said. He said that aircraft are also on stand-by should there be any emergency. The issues are being attended to, he assured. “Everyone is working to stabilize the situation,” he said.
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« Reply #121 on: June 06, 2011, 10:13:12 AM »


Residents pass close to a submerged pick-up on a flooded Lethem street on June 5, 2011


A flooded Lethem street on Saturday


A boat close to the water-covered roundabout on what was once the road leading to the Lethem airstrip.


A man cycles through a flooded Lethem street on June 4, 2011.
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« Reply #122 on: June 06, 2011, 10:16:53 AM »


Rising: Floodwaters in a section of Lethem June 5, 2011.


The Takutu Hotel in Lethem was closed after being flooded by rising waters June 5, 2011.


Water rises on the Takutu Hotel fence in Lethem June 5, 2011.


The Takutu gas station and the Caribe store under water June 5, 2011.
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« Reply #123 on: June 06, 2011, 04:02:19 PM »

Tough times in Lethem. Time to head to Bom Fin.
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« Reply #124 on: June 07, 2011, 11:17:48 AM »

Wonder how many of the remigrants would fall for this scam and how many of them would be walking with their own security detail to prevent execution-style murder upon their arrival within hours after they touch down at CJIA!

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Minimum cap on remigrant spending on housing construction
Written by Denis Chabrol    
Sunday, 05 June 2011 15:04  
  

Housing Minister, Ali addressing the launch of Building Expo 2011.

There is to be a minimum cap on the amount of cash that remigrants can spend on building houses on lands specially set aside for them, according to Housing Minister, Irfaan Ali. “What we want is that everybody who comes back from overseas, they are going to invest a minimum of approximately eighty to one hundred thousand US in the building of their house,” he told demwaves.com .

The Housing Minister explained that the minimum cap is aimed at ensuring that the buildings are of a “certain minimum standard and to maximize the benefit of inflow of resources.” “The economic trickle-down for Guyana would be amazing in the next three to four years,” he told the launch of Building Expo II to be held under the theme ‘Bridging The Gap and Transforming Guyana’ from July 29-31, 2011.

The housing lots for remigrants are expected to be ready by August 1. More than 1,000 overseas-based Guyanese have applied for house-lots either directly or through Guyana’s diplomatic missions abroad, said the Housing Minister. Endorsing Building Expo II, Chairman of the Private Sector Commission (PSC), Ramesh Dookhoo noted that last year’s event generated a lot of business for commercial banks and other companies that created linkages with like-minded firms in the Caribbean. “This is heartening but it must be said that perhaps there is still room for better deals to be worked out with the commercial banks,” he said.

Latest government statistics show a 24 percent increase in lending for housing since the 2010 Expo. At least 60 local and foreign companies will be exhibiting at next month’s event which will feature the introduction of the President’s Award for Innovation in the Building and Construction Sector. The exhibitors will include machinery suppliers, hardware suppliers, private developers, banks and construction service-providers.

The PSC boss identified the need for proper zoning in the construction of houses and other buildings to help ensure that “there is comfort for all.” Another 15,000 house lots could be distributed on the East Bank Demerara within two years of which 3,500 could be ready for distribution by year-end. At least 17,000 house lots have been allocated over the last three years. The construction sector grew by 10.8 percent in 2010 and contributed 10.3 percent of the Gross Domestic Product in the same year.
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« Reply #125 on: June 07, 2011, 11:35:31 AM »

The Guyanese deserve the government they have

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PPP Housing Fraud in Region 9  
guyanaobserver | Monday, 06 June 2011 
 

This house is built at a cost of G$100,000 (US$500) and is being sold for G$2M (US$10,000) to the people of Lethem. Compliments of the corrupt Jagdeo regime. Shame on the PPP.
 
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« Reply #126 on: June 07, 2011, 11:44:34 AM »

“What we want is that everybody who comes back from overseas, they are going to invest a minimum of approximately eighty to one hundred thousand US in the building of their house,” he told demwaves.com .


LOL LOL

Is he kidding. How the hell can you put a cap on housing? Also by putting remigrants in one area makes them vulnerable to bandits. Laughing
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« Reply #127 on: June 07, 2011, 12:02:24 PM »

minimum cap Laughing Laughing  because Irfart Ali is an illiterate canecuttah. he doesn't know the meaning of 'ceiling, floor or cap' Laughing Laughing

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« Reply #128 on: June 07, 2011, 03:24:57 PM »

even mother nature is not letting up on Fagdeo's GAYANA

new river in Lethem - called Fagdeo's CONservancy




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« Reply #129 on: June 08, 2011, 10:41:04 AM »

at this rate when the next heavy rainfall the entire country will be innundated water. And in the meanwhile all Fagdeo's and his men's mansions are under CONstruction at Pradoville 2, they think that they would be immune from the floods.
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« Reply #130 on: June 08, 2011, 10:51:38 AM »

I am glad that the amerindians are speaking out (this letter should serve as a testament that Amerindians are not stupid as they have been perceived by the other races in Guyana. .... so it has been raining for more than two weeks and only now the GOG is attempting to reach out to the affected villagers.

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Ministry of Sport team to Rupununi seemed more concerned with publicity than sports
By Stabroek staff  |  3 Comments  
Letters | Wednesday, June 8, 2011 Share 0Email PrintNext Page »Dear Editor,

A few weeks ago Lethem was graced with the presence of the hierarchy of the Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sport, including the Minister, the Permanent Secretary and the Director of Sport. It was probably the first time that people came face to face with the Minister and Director of Sport.

This visit coincided with some uniquely coined phrase about community sports participation. A number of villages from the Central Rupununi visited Lethem to participate in the event. They braved the inclement weather and participated gamely in the events. From reports in the daily newspapers it seemed that the ministry was satisfied with the event. After all, there was much photography and videography.

However, the sportspeople of this part of the Rupununi were left with distaste over the event since it seemed to have more to do with political publicity than actual sports in the area. This is because it was more about showboating by the authorities, such as the Minister and Director of Sport kicking off the events, or the Minister stating what the government has done for sports in Guyana such as the National Stadium and swimming pool. Yet absolutely nothing was said about sport in the Rupununi and its development.

Imagine that our Minister, PS and Director – arguably the most powerful team in national sports management in Guyana – visited Lethem for the first time together and yet offered very little for the development of sports in the area. Sports enthusiasts were hopeful that something would have been said about possibly building a sports stadium or a floodlight facility, or providing better transportation for athletes in the region or dealing with other such obvious deficiencies in our sports system in the area. It was also obvious that this high-powered team was ignorant of the sporting pedigree of this region since nothing was mentioned in their speech.

Yet only a few months ago one of our female long distance athletes was recognized in parliament for her sports accomplishments. We would have liked to hear this high-powered government team state how they were going to aid the region in producing similar talents. What about our male and female footballers who frequently adorn our national teams? They have been developed on absolutely minimal input from our government in terms of infrastructural facilities. How about offering a small floodlit stadium for this area Mr Minister? Imagine what could be achieved if we got a little aid from our administrators?

The general demeanour of this team seemed to be one of getting this event over with and collecting maximum publicity. Not once did the team even attempt to meaningfully interact with the many villages that were present to try and identify their sports needs. The team arrived late for the event and departed early – reportedly because of the weather (even though the communities braved similar conditions and participated in its entirety). Even for the duration when they were in the location they spent most of the time out of the venue rather than trying to interact with the communities. Were it not for the local administrators, notably the REO, who gamely tried to ensure that the event reached its climax, then it might have been abandoned early in the day, such was the obvious lack of interest by the ministry’s team.

One even questions why, at this inaugural visit by the Sports Minister, he did not see it fit to spend more than one day in the area. He could have achieved much more from his visit if he was able to have meaningful interaction with the various sports groups and villages. It was almost as if they did not realise how big a role sport plays in this part of the country. He could have seen first hand how many people participate in sports and how important it is as a way of life in these communities. He may then have realised the need to offer more assistance to the communities.

Probably the most insulting thing of all was that this high-powered team visited the area, absorbed maximum publicity for the event and then left without even offering sports equipment to the communities that participated in the activity. Most of these communities are so impoverished that acquiring sports equipment is a prohibitive expense. How much would it have cost the authorities to give sports gear to these communities? The last budget presentation stated that billions of dollars were going to the sports ministry. Couldn’t they at least have spent some of this money on sports gear for the communities which need it the most? Some cynical persons stated that the team should have travelled to Lethem by public aircraft rather than using the chartered flight and they could have used the difference in money to provide sports gear to the communities.

Many people looked forward to the Minister and his team’s visit, hopeful that they were finally going to be able to interact with him and possibly be able to get some assistance for sports in the respective communities. Yet all returned to their villages with nothing to show for the sacrifices that they had made to travel to Lethem to be a part of the activity (the less than $1,000 trophies that were given as prizes are very little consolation).

Even though the sports officials did not deem it important to meet with the sports fraternity of this part of the Rupununi to determine some of their needs, a few suggestions would still be forwarded in the hope that it would meet the interest of those genuinely interested in sports development in the Rupununi.

1)  The Central Rupununi is a sports crazy area with the main games being male and female football, volleyball and futsal. With proper input from the necessary administrators it can produce numerous national quality athletes. There is urgent need for improved sports facilities such as a small floodlit stadium and indoor facilities so that player quality can be upgraded.

2)  There are high quality long distance athletes being produced. There is need for a quality athletics track as well as more athletic equipment for athletes to compete in more events.

3)  There are natural swimmers in the area. A swimming pool should be considered for Lethem.


4)  Transportation is the major bugbear for athletes in the region, especially the outlying areas. Consideration should be given to providing a vehicle, most suitably a truck, for transporting athletes to events both within the region and also nationally. This vehicle should be used for this purpose only.

5)  All communities should be given sports equipment to promote sports development in the area. This not only produces national athletes but also serves as a healthy pastime for the members of the communities.

6)  Due to the area producing natural athletes the ministry should consider introducing other  sports.

Yours faithfully,
(Name and address provided)
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« Reply #131 on: June 08, 2011, 10:57:58 AM »

Over 1,600 farms affected, bridges washed away: Situation dire in Region 9 ... -$50M released for relief works
June 8, 2011 | By KNews | Filed Under News 
By Leonard Gildarie

Residents and authorities alike are praying for a cessation of rains in Lethem as flood waters dropped slightly over the last 48 hours, but losses are continuing to mount in that Region Nine area. An estimated 100 farms in Aishalton, a village 120 miles from Lethem, are under threat and isolated, and residents are desperately scrambling to save cassava and corn crops, in particular. President Bharrat Jagdeo yesterday announced that $50M will be released for relief to the stricken region.

Sand Creek, another community further along in South Central Rupununi, is said to be the hardest hit from the flood waters. Over 1,600 farms are flooded, government reports say. Several plane loads of food supplies from government have been ferried in to Region Nine since Monday.

Several sections of the Linden/Lethem road are still under water with reports coming in that bridges and approaches have been significantly damaged, forcing authorities to admit yesterday that it may take awhile before repairs could be effected and traffic resume. Yesterday, a number of government officials including Minister of Agriculture, Robert Persaud, Minister of Transport, Robeson Benn, and General Secretary of the People’s Progressive Party, Donald Ramotar, were in the region to assess the situation as emergency workers continue to fan out across the communities.

The Red Cross and several volunteer groups were also ferrying water to stricken residents at emergency shelters which now house almost 300 persons. The army has also been helping. The Civil Defence Commission and the Private Sector Commission are also involved. According to Minister Benn, who has been in the area since Sunday, while the Lethem Power Company has fuel to last over a week, seven trucks are stuck on the Linden/Lethem Road and regional authorities are now moving to shuttle the supplies across.

Overhead flights of the trail yesterday showed huge swaths under water, with engineers reporting at least four to five feet of water in some sections. At least three bridges are said to have been washed away, with Aishalton, in the Deep South Rupununi, totally cut off. There were no immediate indications of diseases outbreak or water-borne illness. A total of nine homes are said to have collapsed…three in Katuur in South Central Rupununi and six in Pai Pang, North Rupununi. Yesterday, residents asked for storage and water purification tablets. Several farms, including ones run by schools and families, are under imminent threat with residents scrambling to convert the cassava to farine.

“Every minute, every hour that goes by is worse for us,” one resident said.
Shops also reported that supplies are running low, with the road to Lethem impassable. Residents were assured that more supplies would be flown in as early as today.

Minister Persaud took the opportunity to caution residents that climate change will continue to play havoc with farmers. He said that new ways will have to be found to do farming, citing the experimental Moco Moco project, which recently saw rice being harvested, the same rice which will be used to ensure that food supplies remain stable for the region during the period. At the Culvert City Nursery School, 29 persons whose homes were flooded are being given meals and a place to sleep. At the Arapaima School, another shelter has been set up with almost 80 residents, mainly Amerindians, being taken care of.
Today, the army’s Bell 206 helicopter is being sent in to the region to assist with the emergency works.

Officials are blaming the flood waters on heavy rains in the past few weeks in Northern Brazil, especially in the State of Roraima, which caused the banks for the Rio Branco, Rio Negro, Takutu and Ireng Rivers to overtop. Almost 60% of Lethem is flooded, reports said. The Rio Branco River on the neighbouring Brazil side is said to be about 30 feet over its high-level mark, a worrying fact. Already, Brazil is moving to declare an emergency in the State of Roraima.

Over on the Guyana side, Region Nine’s Regional Executive Officer, Ronald Harsawack, said that officers have been pulled back from other duties and are working with affected farmers and residents. An emergency centre and several smaller offices have been established in a few areas also. Between Monday and Tuesday, there was approximately six inches of rainfall, and reports are that levels are rising significantly in some sections. Contractors are working on a damaged section between Kurupukari and Annai, with three kilometres of roads at the Hunt Oil stretch of the Linden/Lethem Road under water.

Four bridges along the Annai/Lethem strip are said to be damaged while further in the deep South area, approaches to two structures at Araqui and Kabanawau have collapsed. A deck of the Najah Bridge has also been washed away. While the Lethem runway is operational, the apron is under water. The Sand Creek runway, which is flooded, is out of operation. Several government buildings including the Amerindian Hostel and the Nurses Hostel have been converted to shelters. Residents continued yesterday to experience blackouts, with the station still under four feet of water. St Ignatius is reportedly still without power.

Regarding water, Minister Benn disclosed that half of Lethem has been restored with supplies. Culvert City is without potable water. However, supplies are being trucked in to this area. Over 500 head of cattle were moved to higher ground. There were no animal deaths reported. The schools in the area remained closed, but this newspaper understands arrangements have been made for students writing CXC. And police ranks have been equipped with suitable bikes to monitor homes that have been abandoned.
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« Reply #132 on: June 09, 2011, 11:01:43 AM »

Fagdeo will build his next house at this brand new lake  director

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« Reply #133 on: June 09, 2011, 11:06:05 AM »

First was region 4, then was region 9 now mother nature next stop is region 10. Like Fagdeo praying to mother nature to spare Pradoville 1 & 2!

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Flood woes hit Kwakwani residents
June 9, 2011 | By KNews | Filed Under News
 
Panic has hit Region Ten as a number of homes in Kwakwani and surrounding areas have now become flooded. Heavy rainfalls persist causing the overtopping of the Berbice River to occur at some points. Reports are that the “Lamp Island” area is very low and is badly flooded as the water continues to rise daily. Some residents have sought alternative shelters since their homes are now under water.

A Kwakwani resident said yesterday that “the water is higher now than for the past two floods which we had. It is a constant thing for water to rise when it rains heavily but such a flood was not expected. Some people have to relocate”. He explained that every year the rainfall seems to be more intense than the previous year and on this occasion, water from the Berbice River has overtopped at certain sections from both sides of the river, causing more flood damage to the buildings and homes established at the Water Front.

Kaieteur News understands that a nursery school located at the riverbank is flooded with over three feet of water and the school has been closed until further notice. The route used by vehicles to ‘touch down at the shore’ is covered with water and truck operators have to resort to off-loading their items at a further distance where the barge usually operates. Another resident of Kwakwani explained to this newspaper that the current flood situation has been occurring for a little over a month (to date) with the water slowly rising everyday.

He said that only until two weeks ago did the situation worsen. It was then that the water started posing a serious threat to vehicles and began flooding out homes and facilities along the waterfront. The man added that the pontoon continues to be functional and that the high water has not yet caused any problems in this aspect, but if the rain persists then later there will be difficulties for vehicles and people utilising the services of the pontoon.

This newspaper was further told that majority of the areas have not yet been affected by the continuous rainfall. However; if the heavy rains continue then more water will overtop and affect other areas in a short period of time. According to Minister of Health, Dr. Leslie Ramsammy, reports from Kwakwani indicate that there are two main areas of concern: Lamp Island and Water Front. He added that Regional Health Officer, Dr. Pansy Armstrong, is  currently in the area, leading a medical team which is providing support to the health team from the area.

Outreach programmes were conducted in Lamp Island and on the Water Front while the number of reported diarrhea and other cases  from Kwakwani indicate no unusual health impact to date. Only two cases of diarrhea were reported in the last 24 hours. Dr. Ramsammy said that the Ministry of Health continues to maintain standby staff if the need arises for flood affected areas in Regions Nine and Ten. He said, “Medical supplies are ready to be sent if the need arises. The Ministry of health has already begun to add to its stock of bleach and other disinfectant supplies. The situation on the ground appears stable, but the health workers recognise the need for continued vigilance”. (Kristen Macklingam)
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« Reply #134 on: June 09, 2011, 11:21:32 AM »

Are we heading for a housing bubble?
By Stabroek staff  |  4 Comments |Letters | Thursday, June 9, 2011

Dear Editor,

Are Guyanese homeowners in a housing bubble? A blogger asserted that the average home mortgage payment in Guyana is almost 75% of the average worker’s income. That is a truly frightening statement of epic and terrifying proportions. It warrants testing.

My focus is on first-time homeowners getting government allocated housing lots as they are most likely to obtain low-cost mortgages, have generally poor to average incomes, possess little or no pre-existing equity and pose the greatest risk of defaulting. The PPP claims it has allocated nearly 100,000 house lots, plans to distribute 40,000 more lots this year and has regularised nearly 24,000 lots by giving title to squatters on those lands (see Anil Nandlall’s ‘Land amendment bill was promulgated to address a serious problem’ SN, March 16, 2011). That is a claimed distribution of around 124,000 house lots over 19 years (164,000 when additional 40,000 for distribution this year are added). The bulk of the distribution occurred under the Bharrat Jagdeo administration. If we assume that 80% or approximately 131,000 of those 164,000 government-issued homeowners assum-ed or will assume by the end of 2011 a low-cost mortgage at an average of $5.5 million (median of $3 million and $8 million maximums under the low-cost mortgage plans), we are looking at nearly $720.5 billion in these mortgages being held by the riskiest debtors and the likeliest defaulters. That number is US$3.6 billion, which outstrips the entire GDP of this country by a clear US $1.5 billion.

A bubble arises from lack of affordability. Our GDP per capita is US$2501, meaning our GDP is US$2501 for every citizen. A $5.5 million mortgage on a 20 year term at 6.25% interest generates monthly payments of approximately $40,000 per month or $480,000 or US$2400 per annum. On a 30 year term, the monthly payment decreases to roughly $34,000 per month or $408,000 per annum or US$2040 per annum. With GDP per capita at US$2501, any blind man can see that is a stricken danger zone waiting to explode.

The public sector minimum wage in 2010 was $33,207 according to the Finance Minister. It is abundantly clear that public sector minimum wage does not pay a low-cost mortgage. The normal acceptable affordability index requires that mortgage payments do not exceed 30% of one’s gross income. To properly afford a low-cost mortgage of $40,000 in order to live the PPP’s dream of housing for all, a typical Guyanese must earn $133,333 or US$667 per month for the next 20 years. After the 16% in VAT, the 33% in personal income taxes, the ridiculous duties to clear a barrel necessary for survival and the corruption and bribery payments, how are people affording these homes? US$600 million in remittances and barrels every year is helping to pay for this exuberance and keeping this country alive.

The truth about housing under the PPP is that the government has created a bubble and the associated frenzy of greed, materialism and living beyond one’s means that goes with it. Mansion-filled Pradovilles have propelled this feeding frenzy of avarice. But there are other burning issues too.

Between the censuses of 1991 and 2002 while the number of dwellings increased by 28,456 and the number of homes owned increased by 19,092, the rate of home ownership barely moved (63.2% to 63.8%) although the population remained virtually stagnant. This raises the question of, if not new owners, who got those 28,456 new dwellings? The only plausible response is that those already with homes got those new homes. Unless the numbers from the 2012 Census will prove differently, this points dramatically to what happened in the USA where rampant speculation by those with the pecuniary means led to financial ruin. The rich simply got richer by buying more homes and flipping them at bubble prices until the orgy snapped. The census statistics also point to the fact that many who get house lots from the government simply cannot afford to build or to construct a decent home.

Where can the poor of this country get a 10% down payment on a million dollars? Who can afford to build a house in this environment of runaway costs and inflationary spirals? The powerless go from squatting on the land of others to squatting in squalid conditions on their own land. Every new housing scheme now has its corner of squalor. We have a $720.5 billion (US$3.6 billion) problem bubbling. A 10% bubble bursting default tsunami would be a $72billion problem for a country with a budget of $161.4 billion.

That is 44.6% of our 2011 budget. That is untold economic decimation and accompanying crime like we’ve never seen before. Those rattling along in their deluded bubbles waiting to unleash 40,000 new house lots for the sake of a few votes better beware.

Yours faithfully,
M Maxwell
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« Reply #135 on: June 13, 2011, 09:54:53 AM »

Irfart musse think that Guyanese in the disapora are PPP drugbarons who can afford to throw away hundreds of thousands of dollars on a shitty piece land in crime infested Gayana. Irfart high on crack just like Fagdeo and the majority of the PPP freeloaders

*************

An Open Letter to Housing Minister Irfaan Ali
June 12, 2011 | By KNews Letters

Dear Minister Ali,

I write in reference to a news report in DemeraraWaves on Sunday June 5 with the caption: “Minimum cap on re-migrant spending on housing construction”.
In this article, you are quoted to have said, “What we want is that everybody who comes back from overseas, they are going to invest a minimum of approximately eighty to one hundred thousand US in the building of their house”.

As a minister of government, you must be aware that this is a discriminatory act against Guyanese living abroad who may wish to return home one day to live.
And as a patriotic Guyanese living in New York, I can assure you, that I will use all the resources at my disposal to educate and discourage potential re-migrants if this ludicrous idea of yours is ever brought to fruition. Let me explain why:

Most Guyanese living in developed countries have broadened their horizons. They’re exposed to different cultures and have respect for the rule of law. Career opportunities are numerous, and whatever they’re able to accomplish, is limited only by their God-given potential and ability. They benefit from a more advanced healthcare system and tremendous educational opportunities and after-school programs for their children; they feel secure in their homes and on the street; they enjoy a quality of life that is only an illusion to most Guyanese.

Yet most would give that all up to return home with new acquired skills and innovation, and yes, our savings, to create jobs and to play our part to further develop the land we all love. But the risk must be worth the sacrifice we’re asking our families to make. Apart from the duty-free concession offered on a small capacity vehicle and personal effects, there is really no incentive for a Guyanese to return home at this time, and what you are proposing is counter- productive to this effort. The few re-migrants that have returned so far are being targeted by dangerous criminals. Some have been shot, killed and robbed of their possessions… their lives totally destroyed. And this trend is likely to continue unless this Administration finds the courage to stretch the necks of these murderers.

There is severe widespread flooding of the entire coastal area and to some villages inland during heavy rainfall, which not only contributes to the destruction of property, but constitutes a dangerous health hazard. The central water supply to towns and villages lacks adequate pressure and requires residents to install water pumps to increase the flow of water above the first floor. Electricity throughout Guyana is unstable and unreliable, and the frequent ‘blackouts‘ often result in power-surge damages to computers, refrigerators and other electrical household appliances, as most residence cannot afford the cost of installing electrical generators.

With inadequate street lighting and road signs; narrow roads; potholes; cattle and other animals roaming the streets at will; reckless mini-bus drivers and inconsiderate roadside vendors, driving in Guyana is like an accident waiting to happen. Although the health care system is much improved, we are still a long way from providing specialized healthcare and surgeries. As such, the lifestyle, comfort and security that Guyanese living abroad are accustomed to, would be severely compromised by returning home to live.

You may have over one thousand applications for house lots available to re-migrants, but I doubt you will find many who would be willing to pay the asking price of US$35,000 for a homesite (house lot) that’s only 8,000 sq. ft. Especially when a homesite of 10,000 sq. ft. can be purchased in Florida for as little US$12,000. Minister Ali, I can truly understand your objective to establish a development that is of a high standard by setting a minimum building cap, but you are not a private developer Sir, you are a representative of the people, and you cannot discriminate against those Guyanese who can afford and those who cannot. Under the law, we should all be entitled to the same privileges if any, regardless of our individual financial status. But if you must, I have a suggestion that would allow you to enforce this minimum cap stipulation, and one that would bring some success to your remigration efforts:

In a country that is vastly under-populated, where it is believed that there are more Guyanese living overseas than in Guyana, and in a place where land is plentiful, you can offer re-migrants a real incentive to build their homes. Give them the opportunity to buy government land at the same rate that you, other ministers and officials of government, President Jagdeo, and some members of the police and army have already taken advantage of… US$25,000 for one acre, or US$6,000 for a 8,000 sq. ft. homesite. If this price is good for party loyalists and middle-income Guyanese living there that have already benefitted from this, why not offer the same rate to us provided we agree with your minimum cap restriction?

You can be proud of your accomplishments in your official capacity, and both you and the PPP/C Administration must be commended on the tremendous housing program that is creating more home-owners than any other period in our history. And because you’ve made it very affordable for low and middle income families in Guyana to secure land and mortgages with low interest rates to build their homes, you are obligated to regulate building codes and standards there. But how do you dictate and control how much a re-migrant ought to spend on a home when you’re charging them more than the market value for the land?

Thirty five thousand US dollars for a small homesite is a rip-off Sir, not an incentive. And if I’m to pay that much for a houselot, I must decide the area I want to live and the lot I want to live on. Not having some bureaucrat behind a desk making these decisions for me. A re-migrants will have to take into consideration the cash purchase of a new vehicle to use there; freight charges for the vehicle and personal effects; airline tickets; and in Guyana, US$35,000 for the house lot, US$80,000 – US$100,000 to build, a water pump and electrical generator, and the cost associated with employing 24-hour security to guard his expensive home.

You must not assume that all Guyanese residing abroad have the financial resources to do this, for despite the common belief, money does not grow on trees in New York or anywhere else. Overseas-based Guyanese work hard, sacrifice and save to secure a better quality of life for themselves and children. So you see Minister Ali, I ask that you not discriminate, and strongly advise that you refrain from making carless, thoughtless statements that are likely to alienate supporters of Donald Ramotar throughout the diaspora, as this may be misconstrued as being his policy. And if there is any doubt as to how Guyanese overseas are reacting to your ‘minimum cap‘ comment I suggest you read some of the bloggers’ comments associated with this article, and you will find they’re not as polite as this letter I’m writing.


Harry Gill
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« Reply #136 on: June 13, 2011, 10:12:17 AM »

I ain't ready to go back to Guyana. After 40 years outside the country it would mean giving up way too much.

The fact I will be living behind a grilled window doesn't turn me on. I like my open space and freedom too much.

Min Ali here is my idea of luxury.

Luxury is having enough windows to forgo AC, and enough land to forgo curtains.

With the bandits in Guyana I could never live in luxury.
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« Reply #137 on: June 13, 2011, 10:14:36 AM »

Reminds me when BK to me to a restaurant in Richmond Hills and I swear the neighbours could have stretched out of their  window and grabbed my meal off the plate when i wasn't looking.BK what was the name of that restaurant?

Also I don't like living so close that I could piss or spit in my neighbours yard from my window.
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« Reply #138 on: June 13, 2011, 10:48:55 AM »

that was the Nest where they have outside seating at the back of the restaurant during the summer months. the neighbor if they spit too hard from their back door, it would get into the patrons food. I haven't been there in a long long time.
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« Reply #139 on: June 13, 2011, 11:02:22 AM »

1000 houselots allocated at One Stop Shop drive


IN keeping with the government’s vision of ensuring that every citizen enjoys an improved quality of life, the Ministry of Housing allocated close to 1,000 house lots on Thursday last during the fourth One Stop Shop for 2011, at the National Stadium, Providence.


CEO of the Central Housing and Planning Authority (CH&PA), Ms.Myrna Pitt, assisting a future resident of the Eccles Housing Scheme at the One Stop Shop exercise.

More than 3000 persons gathered there to witness and to participate in the life-changing event that will see even more Guyanese citizens and families having a chance to own their own homes in the Eccles Housing Scheme on the East Bank of Demerara.
Addressing the gathering, President Bharrat Jagdeo pointed to the significance of the event, which he noted will result in even more persons having a stake in their country.
As to the vision behind this strategy, he said, “It all ties back to a greater philosophy of the government…it is largely an approach where we see national growth as the aggregate wealth of individuals.”
He noted that in the past, the state had too much of an overwhelming presence in people’s lives and controlled some 80 percent of all economic activities in Guyana, and by extension, most of its assets, particularly land, a reality which the PPP/C administration has moved away from.
“We believe that if you have an aggressive programme where every Guyanese can have access to resources, then they can start the process of accumulation,” President Jagdeo explained.
This accumulation, he stressed, is a critical factor in national development.
Continuing, the Head of State explained that to this end, investments are continually being made in the housing sector to facilitate economic growth and facilitate the growth in families’ wealth.
In light of this, Jagdeo refuted claims in certain sections of the media which suggest that the housing programme targets individuals of certain economic standing and that it will create a ‘housing bubble’, and pointed to the advantages of the programme.

Continued Expansion

Minister of Housing and Water Irfaan Ali addresses citizens’ concerns at the National Stadium.

President Jagdeo assured the gathering that the development along the East Bank corridor will continue to move apace as the country moves forward.
Alluding to this development, he stated, “We have to move forward, Georgetown will be expanded all the way to Diamond on the East Bank of Demerara, the government plans to utilise all of the land acquired from GuySuCo, worth $4B, which will see the development of 10,000 lots.”
In keeping with the developmental trajectory, Jagdeo revealed that there are plans to acquire more land, which will result in the massive extension of the urban area, which in turn will require the expansion of existing infrastructure, including the Diamond Hospital and the four-lane highway.
In addition, he disclosed that the expansion may also include the development of a further two lanes of roadway from Mocha Village on the East Bank of Demerara to Ogle on the East Coast of Demerara, to further ease the traffic congestion.
Amidst concerns surrounding the new Haags Bosch landfill site, situated in the new scheme, the president assured the future residents that this too has been designed, using state-of-the-art technology so that residents will not be affected.
“US$12M has been invested in the Haags Bosch site which will see the installation of proper drainage underground and the installation of filter systems found in sites abroad,” he explained.


President Bharrat Jagdeo assures the gathering of the PPP/C’s commitment to ensuring that every single Guyanese enjoys an improved quality of life

Added to this, a buffer zone comprising various factories will separate the site from the residential area.
He explained that the massive development underway has nothing to do with the fact that this year is an election year, as the project was started two years ago with the initial purchase of the land.
Congratulating the impending homeowners, President Jagdeo said, “I’m convinced that Guyana has to have every single family owning their own house and we can do this.”
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« Reply #140 on: June 13, 2011, 11:08:17 AM »

Quote
President Bharrat Jagdeo assures the gathering of the PPP/C’s commitment to ensuring that every single Guyanese enjoys an improved quality of life

Fagdeo improved quality of life for who? The faggots, rapists and thieves within the ranks of the PPP, while the stupid, gullible canecuttahs will enjoy an improved quality of life -- in the after life!
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« Reply #141 on: June 13, 2011, 02:40:19 PM »

Why wait till elections to start handing out land?

Why does the gov't own most of the land?

Why put stipulations on remigrants when they buy land?

The PPP must think we are stupadee.
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« Reply #142 on: June 14, 2011, 10:36:40 AM »

Why wait till elections to start handing out land? Election gimmick - to buy the stupid canecuttahs' votes

Why does the gov't own most of the land? Because the faggots think that god gave them the lease to 83,000 sq miles

Why put stipulations on remigrants when they buy land? Because many of the remigrants always give the Guyanese at home the impression that they are filthy rich in their new adopted homeland

The PPP must think we are stupadee. No, only those who visit and show off among their relatives and friends, when many of them are forced to slave away at 2 and even 3 jobs to pay their bills
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« Reply #143 on: June 14, 2011, 11:57:33 AM »

Yuh know .... I am happy I don't have any immediate relatives there.

For some reason folks think money comes easy overseas, so they sit back and expect a monthly freck from the expatriots.
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« Reply #144 on: June 15, 2011, 09:23:43 AM »

Yuh know .... I am happy I don't have any immediate relatives there.

For some reason folks think money comes easy overseas, so they sit back and expect a monthly freck from the expatriots.

I still have relatives (aunts, uncles and first cousins) but I don't give a rat's ass because the last time I visited I told all of them to vote the blinking PPP out of power. when people can't hear let them feel or eat crap.
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« Reply #145 on: June 15, 2011, 09:31:20 AM »

May-June rains have rained out and flooded hundreds of villages to date - First Lethem, then Kwakwani, Essequibo and not its Berbice -- and we are seeing the worse floods in the history of the country all happening during Fagdeo years in office. What happen to all the hundreds of thousands of US dollars that Robert Dumbo always claiming that he spend to prepare for the rains?  yeah right -- offshore banking is the name of the game!

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Flood rolls into Upper Corentyne
By Stabroek staff  |  3 Comments |Local News | Wednesday, June 15, 2011

As floodwaters continue to besiege various sections of the country a Crabwood Creek businessman is counting his losses as his resort in the Wonotobo area on the Corentyne River is under several feet of water. Businessman Motie Singh who operates the Courtours tourist entity on the Upper Corentyne told this newspaper yesterday that since  April the water level in the river has been rising. He said that while the rise is expected at this time of the year, “it was the first time in 15  to 20 years we ever see something like this”.

Singh, who operates the entity along with his siblings, noted that late last month the company had to make several trips to and from the Wonotobo, Cow Falls and Goat Landing area along the banks of the river where they operate the business.


A building where guests of Corentyne–based CourTours stay and which stands some 25 feet from the normal water level on the banks of the Corentyne River.

He said that early in April, a decision was made to cancel all tourist bookings to the location since he noted that the weather began to change drastically in the region. He said that as the weeks went by the water level in the river continued to rise and he lost electrical appliances, foodstuff, furniture and the buildings in the area were also damaged. “At Wonotobo alone, the building we have there where we house guests at the resort is close to a beach and as I speak to you now, the beach is no more  and the water level there is above the flooring of the building  which is several feet  off the ground so you could imagine”. Singh said that the company had been working to move what was left of the resort to their home at Springlands on the Corentyne but he noted that, “we may have nothing left”. While he could not give an estimate as regards the losses he had suffered, the man noted that the buildings as well as appliances amounted to millions of dollars.


An employee of Courtours stands in waist-high waters at the company’s Goat Landing base on the Corentyne River a few days ago. The water level in the area rose several inches yesterday.

At Cow Falls, which is located close to a plateau, the water levels have covered the falls while at the Goat Landing area several buildings which are owned by the Singhs as well as other businessmen in the area have been under water. The Singhs also operate a logging concession in the Upper Corentyne area and Singh told this newspaper yesterday that his siblings have had to shift their operations farther inland, adding that the area connects to Kwakwani which is experiencing flooding at the moment.

The man noted that several logging concessions in the Corentyne area have also been under water and according to him, concessionaires have met with the Guyana Forestry Commission on the issue. He said too that the Ministry of Agriculture was also informed of the situation. While the communities along the Lower Corentyne River are miles apart and sparsely populated, this newspaper understands that persons living there have been moving further inland to higher ground even as the water in the nearby river continues to rise.


These men caught this fish in the upper flat of the Courtours resort main building at Wonotobo on the Corentyne River which has overtopped in recent weeks.

The Orealla waterfront has been inundated within the past few weeks and reports are that several buildings which are positioned at the front of the community have been under several inches of water.

Cassava crops
Meanwhile, the government has made several interventions in the flood-hit Region Nine area where some 117 acres of farmlands of mostly cassava crops were affected in the various communities and according to a Government Information Agency (GINA) release, the MoA has made interventions to assist farmers in saving their crops. The release stated that Amerindian Affairs Minister Pauline Sukhai led a team of officials from that ministry on outreaches to several communities including Aishalton, Sand Creek and Karasabai to gather detailed information as regards the impact the floods have had on residents and their livelihoods.

The release stated that the MoA had intensified its efforts to assist farmers  in reducing crop losses and according to GINA, officers of the ministry have been visiting farms in the various communities to advise about measures which can be taken. According to GINA, Sukhai said that initiatives such as the provision of cassava mills to affected residents will contribute significantly to the villages’ food security in the coming weeks. In addition, she advised the  village councils in the region  to keep the ministry informed on the immediate  needs of the various communities in order for the government to extend the necessary assistance to aid their recovery.

Excessive rainfall in the watershed of the Essequibo and west into the Rio Branco fluvial system in northern Brazil, has seen the rivers rise more than 20 feet within the past two weeks  resulting in extensive flooding and submerged farms in  communities in the  Region 9 area and the South Pakaraimas.
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« Reply #146 on: June 15, 2011, 09:35:50 AM »

Why wait till elections to start handing out land?

Why does the gov't own most of the land?

Why put stipulations on remigrants when they buy land?

The PPP must think we are stupadee.


Lands are given long before elections the govt is just continuing with the distribution of lands to other applicants.You guys are running away with the wrong idea cause land was given last years to a number of applicants.
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« Reply #147 on: June 15, 2011, 09:41:03 AM »

What percentage of land to date was handed out "long before elections". LOL

Just in time for elections.
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« Reply #148 on: June 15, 2011, 09:59:13 AM »

There are a few conditions that Fagdeo attached to the houselots.  He and the rest of his 40 thieves have been telling the recipients that if they do not vote for the PPP they will lose the houselots (and the house if they build a house on the lot by then).
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« Reply #149 on: June 15, 2011, 10:23:56 AM »

When will Fagdeo and Irfart give houselots or house to all the hundreds/thousands of people living in privately-run homeless shelters?  The growing number of homeless people under the thieving PPP is shameless - I am surprised that they haven't blamed the PNC for this shameful situation.
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